Repeated sprint training in football

Please see our section anaerobic endurance.

 

Repeated sprint training in football is not aerobic in nature, however, it has an effect on the aerobic endurance capacity (1-14) - see references below.

 

Training protocols utilizing repeated sprints can be found under the section anaerobic endurance.

 

References

 

1. Mujika, I., et al. Age-related differences in repeated-sprint ability in highly

trained youth football players. J. Sports. Sci. 1-10(iFirst article), 2010.


2. Spencer, M., et al. Fitness determinants of repeated-sprint ability in highly

trained youth football players. Int. J. Sports. Physiol. Perform. 6(4):

497-508, 2011.


3. Meckel, Y., O. Machnai and A. Eliakim. Relationship among repeated

sprint tests, aerobic fitness, and anaerobic fitness in elite adolescent soccer players. J. Strength. Cond. Res. 23(1): 163-169, 2009.


4. Burgomaster, K. A., et al. Six sessions of sprint interval training increases

muscle oxidative potential and cycle endurance capacity in humans. J.

Appl. Physiol. 98(6): 1985-1990, 2005.


5. Dawson, B., et al. Changes in performance, muscle metabolites,

enzymes and fibre types after short sprint training. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. 78:163-169, 1998.


6. Harmer, A. R., et al. Skeletal muscle metabolic and ionic adaptations

during intense exercise following sprint training in humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 89(5):1793-1803, 2000.


7. Linossier, M. T., et al. Performance and fibre characteristics of human

skeletal muscle during short sprint training and detraining on a cycle ergometer. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. 75: 491-498, 1997.

 

8. Burgomaster, K. A., et al. Six sessions of sprint interval training increases

muscle oxidative potential and cycle endurance capacity in humans. J.

Appl. Physiol. 98(6): 1985-1990, 2005.


9. Dawson, B., et al. Changes in performance, muscle metabolites,

enzymes and fibre types after short sprint training. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. 78:163-169, 1998.


10. Harmer, A. R., et al. Skeletal muscle metabolic and ionic adaptations

during intense exercise following sprint training in humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 89(5):1793-1803, 2000.


11. Linossier, M. T., et al. Performance and fibre characteristics of human

skeletal muscle during short sprint training and detraining on a cycle ergometer. Europ. J. Appl. Physiol. 75: 491-498, 1997.


12. MacDougall, J. D., et al. Muscle performance and enzymatic adaptations

to sprint interval training. J. Appl. Physiol. 84(6): 2138-2142, 1998.


13. Rodas, G., et al. A short training programme for the rapid improvement of

both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. 82(5-6):

480-486, 2000.


14. Tonnessen, E., et al. The effect of 40-m repeated sprint training on

maximum sprinting speed, repeated sprint speed endurance, vertical jump, and aerobic capacity in young elite male soccer players. J. Strength. Cond. Res. 25(9): 2364-2370, 2011.


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